1. Odusevio me ovaj Janjic, covek sve zna. Voleo bih da ga vidim u nasem timu, kada vec iz politickih razloga nema mesta za Svilanovica i Covica.
    (trpko, 28. februar 2006 15:49)

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  2. Pa dobro, nisu tu samo Madjari u pitanju nego i Srbi u Republici Srpskoj i muslimani u Sandzaku, Crna Gora bi verovatno ostala na Cetinju sa okolinom, ni Hrvatska ne moze potpuno mirno da spava (istarski Italijani), Madjari u Transilvaniji bi odmah trazili isto sto i njihovi zemljaci u Backoj; sta sa Albancima u Makedoniji, Grckoj? Ocigledno je da nezavisnost Kosova otvara Pandorinu kutiju i povlaci citav niz pitanja na citavom Balkanu koji se, da podsetimo, prostire od Madjarske do Grcke i od Turske do Slovenije. Ako Srbija, objektivno, zaostaje u odnosu na razvijeni svet jedno 10-20 godina, kosovsko drustvo je bar u jednovekovnom zaostatku i kao takvo apsolutno nesposobno da na legalan nacin samostalno ucestvuje u medjunarodnim odnosim.
    (Doctor Wu, 28. februar 2006 19:51)

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  3. Procitao sam Janjicevu analizu u jednom dahu...au sto je ovaj srbin pametan!U cijeloj toj filofstini Janjic ipak promasuje veliku sliku:kako god da srbi hoce da rijese Kosovo u njihovu korist ipak, neminovni prirodno-demografski,geopoliticki, jednom rijecju prirodni faktor ipak odlucuje da ce albanci u buducnosti biti nezavisni i ujedinjeni i tako ce se stvoriti dobar i definitivan ekuilbrrijum na Balkanu.Zato bi bilo jako korisno da Srbi to shvate na vrijeme i objektivno, tako da razviju dobrosusjedke i ekonomske odnose sa albancima sto prije. Mislim da bi im koristilo njima najvise.
    (A. Kurti, 1. mart 2006 05:39)

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  4. I would greatly appreciate if this letter is translated into Serbian (I understand most of it due to my prior involvement in the country, but cannot write in it).

    There are three fundamental issues that the gentleman you interviewed is missing:
    1. On the front of foreign direct investments, the fact that companies from one country invest in another country have most of the time beneficial impacts in terms of creation of employment in the country where they are invested in (although not necessarily so since sometimes – or I should say most of the times – a large number of the workforce is laid off when new investors come). Be it as it is, the other impact that FDI has is that the investor is always, by definition, buying a country's (in this case your country) assets, and as such, having more American investors in your country only strengthens the hand of the Americans and not yours. The gentleman you interviewed seems to blindly believe that having American invest billions of dollars in your country strengthens your hand, which is very irresponsible and, pardon my language, ignorant on his behalf.
    2. From discussions I have in Washington circles, one needs not forget that Americans know that your prime minister was killed in bright daylight under a veil of secrecy that is not clear to this day. As such, out of all countries in the region, your country is seen as having the weakest link in terms of democratic control of armed and police forces. As such, the gentlemen you interviewed has got it fundamentally wrong in terms of where the source of instability is seen in the Balkans: it is your country, not Kosovo. Which is why they, especially the Americans, would like to have your country in NATO as soon as possible – that is just about the only way they can have some kind of confidence that they can control your apparatus of force. Your readers should therefore be very cautious of the analysis the gentleman makes: it has been and it still is your country that has financed, supported, and partaken in the most brutal war in the recent European history. To date, neither American nor the European care who was right or wrong, what they want is a house in order, and especially after killing Dindic, your country still shows ‘red’ in the political radar screens. Anyone who claims something else is fooling him/herself.
    3. On Kosovo status part of the interview, I don’t know much about developments on that front so there is not much I can add. But one thing that needs to be told to your readers is that Albanians are seen, especially in here in the US, as the most pro-western peoples of the Balkans, especially in their opposition to anything that is Slavic and Russian. Americans now cooperate but still don’t have much liking about Russians and know that they can use Albanians as counterbalancing act any time they want to. To their credit, despite all the noise that has been created around it, Albanians did not create a pact with the devil and are the only majority Islamic nation in Europe that has no Jihadist elements in it, although the Slavic populations of the Balkans and wider would love to say otherwise, albeit with no evidence – Americans would be the first to publish any slightest evidence of that in today’s post 9/11 world. So by and large, if you have visionaries in your country, they would know that the balance of power is changing in the Balkans. By 2050, it will be the Albanians who will dominate the population map of that region, and unless they screw it royally, which I think they will not, they will have all the time with the American and European support to fix the issues that, frankly, neither Turks, nor Hodxa, nor you Serbs in the last 100 years or so let them fix: education, economic development, and industrialization. Once they have that, I would want to be friends with them rather than their eternal enemy. But then again, that is for Serbs to decide. For all his insightful comments he made, Mr. Janic missed this point, and most importantly, which actually lead me to write this response, he kind of gives false hope to your readers where hope there is none on the issues of Kosovo becoming independent – it kind of sounded like comforting an alcoholic who is withdrawing from alcohol by telling him that there are still liqueur shops out there.

    My best regards and thank you,

    Gene Perez
    (Roy P., 3. mart 2006 22:07)

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