Three Serb generals: Why does Pristina want our head

Of the 11 indictments taken over by Kosovo courts from EULEX, three are against retired generals: Bozidar Delic, Ljubisa Dikovic, and Momir Stojanovic.

Source: Sputnik
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Gen. Ljubisa Dikovic (screenshot, file)
Gen. Ljubisa Dikovic (screenshot, file)

Kosovo courts have taken over war crimes cases from EULEX, and apart from the crimes committed by the KLA ("Kosovo Liberation Army") against Serbs, they will also deal with crimes against the Albanians that the Serbs are suspected of committing.

Retired General Ljubisa Dikovic, former head of the (Serbian Army) General Staff and (a commander) during the conflict in Kosovo, spoke for Sputnik to wonder why EULEX - the EU he EU rule of law mission in Kosovo - failed to issue indictments against Albanian terrorists who committed crimes in time. This is now another procedure that needs to justify the 1999 (NATO) aggression and everything that was happening in Serbia, Dikovic told Sputnik.

"The fact that the court has been surrendered to the Siptars (Albanians) clearly says who's on whose side and who wants what. I don't have anything new to say, there has been a lot of talk about it, and it's no coincidence that it's us in the indictments. It's clear they've made their choice deliberately. We defended our country, we acted according to the Constitution and laws - let others do what they want," General Dikovic said.

He added that he will most likely respond to the court's summon - but would first "consult his state."

General Bozidar Delic, as well as Dikovic, is yet to learn what specifically he is accused of. He says that, considering what kind of court this is, he would not be surprised if it "came up with anything." He believes that the Albanians in this process have had the help of Natasa Kandic, that is, the Humanitarian Law Center, which made baseless accusations against him three times in the past - considering that no charges were filed regarding any of the accusations.

He added that the Albanians are trying in every possible way try to present Kosovo as a state, which, he said, is "a state of criminal clans." Although the court had been set up with the goal of primarily prosecuting their own for committing war crimes against the Serbs, they have not done anything so far, so they have expanded the indictments, says Delic.

Delic pointed out that in the past he appeared on several occasions before the Hague Tribunal, as an expert and three times as a witness, and that he has a document stating that the court does not consider to him to be a potential defendant. Asked whether he would respond to the Pristina court summons, the general said that he cannot respond to a court of a non-existent state.

"As someone who will never recognize such a state, of course I will not. I have my own state that has a judicial system, if it thinks that I need to explain something, I will be happy to respond," Delic told Sputnik.

General Momir Stojanovic, who was the head of the military security service in Kosovo and Metohija, told Sputnik that he is accused of allegedly making a speech during the funeral of his wife's cousin in Djakovica - a Serbian policeman killed in an ambush. "I allegedly said that 100 Albanians would pay for his head with their own heads, which is absolutely not true," Stojanovic said.

"I did not attend that funeral, nor did I say that at any point, which is easy to prove. They also accuse me of, together with the chief of police in Djakovica and the head of the DB (State Security), holding a meeting in a house where I planned some action in the area of Meja, it's an area near Djakovica, and that about 100 Albanians were killed, shot dead, in this action," he says.

Stojanovic explained that as a member of the military security he was in no way able to participate in planning, or commanding combat operations, and that i it i widely known that people in his line of work do not deal with that.

He added that he was twice a defense witness before the Hague Tribunal - during the trials against (Army) General (Vladimir) Lazarevic and MUP General Vlastimir Djordjevic. "We went over all those events since 1998 with the war crimes prosecutor's office in The Hague, there was never any doubt, any stain on my actions in the line of duty," Stojanovic said, and added that he is deeply proud of everything he has done for his country.

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