"D-Day" for Kosovo "army": Thaci in uniform, Vucic in south

Laws are expected to be adopted in Pristina on Friday that would allow the formation of the "army" of Kosovo.

Source: B92
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Hashim Thaci (Tanjug/AP)
Hashim Thaci (Tanjug/AP)

Vucic travels to the Ground Security Zone. Covic: KFOR should be afraid.

All media in Belgrade, but also in Pristina, marked today as "D-Day" for the formation an army in Kosovo. Kosovo President Hashim Thaci is already in uniform.

Currently, this is designated as the transformation of Kosovo Security Forces (KSF) into Kosovo's armed forces, which essentially means the formation of an army, Nebojsa Covic told Prva TV.

The former head of the Coordination Body for Kosovo and Metohija says Pristina is using such wording to mask the violation of their own constitution - because both that document and all other valid documents, such as UN Security Council Resolution 1244 and the Ahtisaari plan - make existence of the armed forces of Kosovo unconstitutional and impossible without the consent of minority communities.

According to Covic, in all likelihood, Kosovo will form the armed forces, which represents a major destabilization of not only the region but also in broader terms.

Asked how Serbia should react, Covic said: "Our side should have been studying for a long time taking new measures - the exit of the Serb List from the Kosovo Assembly. That would then be a blow to Haradinaj's government, because I don't believe that now that the Special Court (Specialist Chambers) is breathing down their neck, they could form some minority government."

Serbia must, he said, remain cool-headed. Asked how the Serbian Army might react and if it can react, Covic replied: "The Serbian Army has the potential to act, I would not want that, but there's a limit to everything. KFOR in its potential down there is not a problem, but observed in broader terms, it is."

According to Covic, all this is creating great tension - but he does not believe that Serbs have a reason to be afraid. They can, as he pointed out, be concerned, but those who are "in the sandwich," which is KFOR, should be more afraid. "Serbs on one side, Serbs on the other," Covic concluded.

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