New poll explores attitudes toward Kosovo issue

A new B92/Ipsos Strategic Marketing opinion poll shows that most Serbians consider Kosovo to be "effectively independent".

Source: B92

However, most of the 1,003 respondents would not choose EU membership over the province, and have faith in the negotiating skills of Prime Minister Ivica Dačić.

61 percent said that Dačić was doing a good job in the Kosovo talks, while 21 percent were of the opposite opinion. 18 percent had no answer to this question.

Of those who said that Dačić was representing his country's interests poorly, 35 percent said they would rather see Aleksandar Vučić in his place, while an equal number - seven percent - would choose Boris Tadić and Vojislav Koštunica.

58 percent said that Dačić's government is "negotiating better", while only 13 percent said the previous cabinet, headed by Mirko Cvetković, did a better job.

19 percent believe that both governments have failed when it comes to the negotiations.

The Kosovo talks in Brussels are sponsored by the EU - and we asked the poll's respondents to rate the organization's approach to the two sides.

78 percent do not consider the EU to be neutral - of those, 86 percent believe it is biased in favor of Kosovo Albanians, while six percent said it stood "for its own interests".

Only three percent said that this bias was in favor of Serbia.

At the same time, 16 percent of Serbians think that the EU does have a neutral approach to the talks, while six percent had no answer.

As for the status of Kosovo - whose ethnic Albanians five years ago unilaterally declared independence, a proclamation which Serbia does not accept - 63 percent of the survey's respondents said it was "effectively independent", 32 percent said it was not independent, while five percent did not provide an answer.

But when asked which they would choose - Serbia's membership in the EU or a complete restoration of Kosovo within Serbia's system - 65 percent chose Kosovo over the EU.

28 percent of Serbians see the EU as more important in this context, while seven percent were undecided.

Society

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