Committee proposed to monitor election campaign

BELGRADE -- Program Director of Transparency Serbia Nemanja Nenadić has said that a parliamentary committee should be formed to monitor the upcoming election campaign.

(Tanjug, file)
(Tanjug, file)

The formation of this committee is necessary to prevent the abuse of public offices for promotional purposes, said Nenadić.

"An election campaign certainly awaits us, and very soon, and almost certainly there will not be time to correct all the things that need to be done before the announcement of elections, things that have been trailing us since the last election campaign," he said, and explained that "all suspicions of abuse of public resources and vote buying should be investigated, while what has been a mass phenomenon in all previous elections - the use of public offices for promotional purposes - should be prevented."

Nenadić told RTS that Transparency Serbia had already sent a proposal to parliament to form a supervisory committee made up of representatives of the professional community, which should be supported by all parties.

According to him, the committee would "monitor the behavior of public officials during the campaign, to prevent witnessing one more time a series of openings schools, hospitals, roads... finished and unfinished."

Nenadić said that in this way, Serbia would have "a clean election campaign to consider the offered political ideas."

When it comes to the 24 disputed privatizations, Nenadić stated that the government should say which of the issues raised by the Anti-Corruption Council in their reports published in the past ten years were found to be irrefutably true, and which were not.

The government owes us an answer about this, said Nenadić.

"We heard from the government two years ago that 24 cases of disputed privatizations have priority and some special, ad hoc teams were formed, but we have no information as to what will happen after that, will these structures continue to work in that form," he said.

Nenadić also told RTS that the government, prosecutors and the police should say whether such teams will exist in the future, with a clear mandate regulated by law.