Kosovo dialogue to continue "after holidays"

BELGRADE -- PM and Interior Minister Ivica Dačić has said that "authorized services will react should they establish that President Tomislav Nikolić has been wiretapped."

(Tanjug)
(Tanjug)

“If abuse took place, it is their job to look into it and to react,” Dačić told the press conference at the base of the Counter-Terrorist Unit (PTJ).

He stressed that the policy of the government and his own as the minister, and of the chief of police, is such that nobody even considers the option of wiretapping the president, the prime minister or the first deputy prime minister.

"The job of the police and security services is not wiretapping, but rather the protection of the most important state officials," Dačić said.

He underlined that all structures engaged in security matters "should react to the possibility of someone wiretapping the president and investigate and establish if there are grounds for such claims."

Wiretapping of the president of Serbia is not a topic to be discussed by the parties in power at a political level, added Dačić.

President Nikolić said earlier this week that the "scandal" was not over, and that he was still being wiretapped.

Dačić also announced on Friday that the Belgrade-Priština dialogue will continue in Brussels after the holidays, but an exact date is yet to be determined, and he also underlined that problems in Kosovo are being resolved every day.

"For the time being, it is certain that the working groups of Belgrade and Priština will hold a meeting on January 9," Dačić said, adding that, even without that meeting, everyday problems are being solved, that being mostly the responsibility of Aleksandar Vulin, Serbia's minister without portfolio in charge of Kosovo.

The idea of Brussels is that the next round of the dialogue be held on January 17, he said, adding that he was yet to give his consent for that date.

Dačić denied media reports that Belgrade and Priština would continue talks in Brussels on January 19.

"Confirmation of good relations"

Dačić made the statements after he tourned the PTJ base in Lipovica near Belgrade, accompanied by Russian Ambassador Aleksandr Chepurin.

Chepurin handed over to the unit a donation of crude oil from the Russian company Lukoil.

The diplomat said that the donation was another symbolic contribution to the comprehensive and good cooperation between the two countries.

Dačić thanked Lukoil and the Russian Federation for the donation, and pointed out that it is a confirmation of friendly bilateral relations, which are developing in a good direction.

Dačić expressed hope that in 2014 Serbia will not need its special counter terrorist units like the PJT to intervene, and that many significant development projects, such as the construction of the South Stream gas pipeline, will begin next year.

Dačić said that the construction of the pipeline will be a major impetus to the entire country.

Earlier, Chepurin and Dačić attended a ceremony at which New Year's presents were handed out to children of current PTJ members, as well as to children of those killed in action.

Dačić said that the job of the police force, including that of the unit, "is not always easy and that it entails the most difficult interventions."

Care for the families of fallen police officers is a must, Dačić said, adding that around 1,000 police officers have lost their lives in the line of duty over the past 20 years.